Splitting the Soil

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Emily wrote, “Publication — is the auction / of the Mind of Man …” and called it a “foul” thing. And I must admit it is hard for me to “promote” my own book. But I don’t really think about it that way, in a “marketing” way. Instead, I like to think of it as a way of sharing how I see the world, how I interact with it. That’s not foul, and no one makes much money publishing poetry, so if that’s the motivation for a poet, s/he may need to find a different genre or profession.
 

Today I spent time in my garden, not planting, but moving. It’s too early to plant where I live. I have planted this early in the past and gotten bitten (think frost) for doing such. So to tame my great urge to sow, I simply moved things around. I recall what was choking on one another last year, how the day lilies were too close to my butterfly bushes, so I moved them. And all of those of volunteer pansies that have sprouted in the gravel drive —  they have been moved to clay pots by the front steps. I even found an earthworm today and held him in my hand. This communion with nature made me terribly happy.
 

My chap is titled Splitting the Soil, as the soil, nature, and land all are part of the themes that run through it. Also, the sensuality of the relationship between myself and the land is present. I was blessed to have three poet/mentors give me a blurb, and I want to share Kay Byer’s words. Kay is known all over, but she is certainly a prominent figure in my writing life and in the region in which I live. She was the poet laureate of NC when I went to my first NCWN annual meeting, and she pushed me and grilled me in that workshop over a decade ago, long before I enrolled in grad school. She, too, loves the land with a fervor I share.
 

“Royston has claimed her place as a poet, a place rich with memory, family, and voices rising up from the woods and trails of the natural world. Royston can craft poems using traditional form, or she can unwind skeins of free verse as skillfully as any young poet writing today. She listens, she observes, she remembers, and out of that poetic attentiveness she creates poems that ring true to the ear and remain in the imagination, shining like creek water in the afternoon sun.” –Kathryn Stripling Byer, author of Wildwood Flower and Descent

If you’d like a copy of Splitting the Soil, email me or check visit Finishing Line Press.  In the meantime, be outside.

 

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